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By ASKM

Posts Tagged ‘11gR2’

RAC Administration 11gR2 – Weekend Online Training

Posted by Srikrishna Murthy Annam on November 6, 2013

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Posted in 11gR2 RAC, RAC | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Installing 11gR2 Single Instance Database With Non-ASM Storage

Posted by Srikrishna Murthy Annam on December 17, 2010

The present demo shows you how to install 11gR2 single instance database with Non-ASM storage.
Following sequence is followed ..

  1. Install Linux 5.x on VMware server linux machine
  2. Prepare Linux Machine for 11gR2 software installation
  3. Install 11gR2 software
  4. Create 11gR2 database with Non-ASM storage

1. Install Linux 5.x on VMware server linux machine

Follow the demo  VMware Server – Linux installation and complete the linux installation.

2. Prepare Linux Machine for 11gR2 software installation

Follow the article  Prepare Linux virtual machine for 11gR2 installation on Linux 5.x and prepare Linux OS for 11gR2 Database Installation.

3. Install 11gR2 software

Follow the following demo and install 11gR2 software.

4. Create 11gR2 database with Non-ASM storage

Follow the following demo to create 11gR2 database with Non-ASM storage.

Now you installed 11gR2 database successfully.

Hope it helps

SRI


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Posted in Database Articles, VMWARE | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

SCAN in 11gR2 Grid InfraStructure

Posted by Srikrishna Murthy Annam on September 2, 2010

11gR2 grid infrastructure uses SCAN, which is a new concept we use for all client connections. SCAN is single client access name and it is a new feature in 11g Release 2 that provides a single name for clients to access an Oracle Database running in a cluster. The benefit is clients using SCAN do not need to change if you add or remove nodes in the cluster.

Prior to 11gR2 , the tnsnames.ora entries are

TESTDB =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = rac01-vip)(PORT = 1521))
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = rac02-vip)(PORT = 1521))
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVER = DEDICATED)
(SERVICE_NAME = testdb.example.com)
)
)

In 11gR2 , the tnsnames.ora entries look like ….

TESTDB =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = rac-scan.example.com)(PORT = 1521))
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVER = DEDICATED)
(SERVICE_NAME = testdb.example.com)
)
)

The only difference is that , we specify the scan name instead of all VIPs in the tnsnames.ora file.

So what is the benifit with it?

Suppose if you are adding any node to the cluster, you need to specify corresponding VIP entry for that node in the tnsnames.ora prior to 11gR2. But with SCAN name, we dont need to do any modifications to the tnsnames.ora file. SCAN name will resolve and load balance the client connections to all the nodes in the RAC.

SCAN configuration in the cluster :

The SCAN is configured during the installation of the grid infrastructure that is distributed with Oracle Database 11g Release2. So in order to configure SCAN, you need to create a single name that resolves to 3 IP addresses using a round robin algorithm. The IP addresses must be on the same subnet as your public network in the cluster.
rac-scan.example.com IN A 133.22.67.194
IN A 133.22.67.193
IN A 133.22.67.192

SCAN Details

[grid@rac01 ~]$ host rac-scan
rac-scan.example.com has address 133.22.67.192
rac-scan.example.com has address 133.22.67.193
rac-scan.example.com has address 133.22.67.194
[grid@rac01 ~]$ nslookup rac-scan
Server:         133.22.5.53
Address:        133.22.5.53#53

Name:   rac-scan.example.com
Address: 133.22.67.194
Name:   rac-scan.example.com
Address: 133.22.67.193
Name:   rac-scan.example.com
Address: 133.22.67.192

[grid@rac01 ~]$ ping rac-scan
PING rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.193) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.193): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.187 ms
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.193): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.144 ms
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.193): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.152 ms

— rac-scan.example.com ping statistics —
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 1999ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.144/0.161/0.187/0.018 ms
[grid@rac01 ~]$ ping rac-scan
PING rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.192) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.192): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.042 ms
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.192): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.046 ms
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.192): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.051 ms

— rac-scan.example.com ping statistics —
3 packets transmitted, 3 received, 0% packet loss, time 1999ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.042/0.046/0.051/0.006 ms
[grid@rac01 ~]$ ping rac-scan
PING rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.194) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.194): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.144 ms
64 bytes from rac-scan.example.com (133.22.67.194): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.164 ms

— rac-scan.example.com ping statistics —
3 packets transmitted, 2 received, 33% packet loss, time 2001ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.144/0.154/0.164/0.010 ms
[grid@rac01 ~]$

[root@rac01 network-scripts]# /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/srvctl config scan_listener
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN1 exists. Port: TCP:1521
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN2 exists. Port: TCP:1521
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN3 exists. Port: TCP:1521
[root@rac01 network-scripts]# /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/srvctl config scan
SCAN name: rac-scan, Network: 1/133.22.38.0/255.255.255.0/eth2
SCAN VIP name: scan1, IP: /rac-scan.example.com/133.22.67.192
SCAN VIP name: scan2, IP: /rac-scan.example.com/133.22.67.194
SCAN VIP name: scan3, IP: /rac-scan.example.com/133.22.67.193
[root@rac01 network-scripts]#

[grid@rac01 ~]$ srvctl status scan
SCAN VIP scan1 is enabled
SCAN VIP scan1 is running on node rac01
SCAN VIP scan2 is enabled
SCAN VIP scan2 is running on node rac02
SCAN VIP scan3 is enabled
SCAN VIP scan3 is running on node rac02
[grid@rac01 ~]$ srvctl status scan_listener
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN1 is enabled
SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN1 is running on node rac01
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN2 is enabled
SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN2 is running on node rac02
SCAN Listener LISTENER_SCAN3 is enabled
SCAN listener LISTENER_SCAN3 is running on node rac02
[grid@rac01 ~]$

[grid@rac01 ~]$ ps -ef | grep -i tns
grid      9052     1  0 Aug09 ?        00:00:01 /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER -inherit
grid      9098     1  0 Aug09 ?        00:00:01 /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER_SCAN1 -inherit
grid     21388 20424  0 05:06 pts/1    00:00:00 grep -i tns
[grid@rac01 ~]$

[grid@rac02 ~]$ ps -ef | grep -i tns
grid      1323  1292  0 05:07 pts/0    00:00:00 grep -i tns
grid      9110     1  0 Aug09 ?        00:00:02 /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER -inherit
grid     17278     1  0 Aug09 ?        00:00:01 /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER_SCAN2 -inherit
grid     17285     1  0 Aug09 ?        00:00:01 /u01/home/11.2.0/grid/bin/tnslsnr LISTENER_SCAN3 -inherit
[grid@rac02 ~]$

[grid@rac02 grid]$ Check_CRS.txt
HA Resource                                        Target     State
———–                                        ——     —–
ora.CRS.dg                                         ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.FRA.dg                                         ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.LISTENER.lsnr                                  ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.LISTENER_SCAN1.lsnr                            ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.LISTENER_SCAN2.lsnr                            ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.LISTENER_SCAN3.lsnr                            ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02

ora.RACDB_DATA.dg                                  ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.asm                                            ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.eons                                           ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.gsd                                            OFFLINE    OFFLINE
ora.net1.network                                   ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.oc4j                                           OFFLINE    OFFLINE
ora.ons                                            ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.rac01.ASM1.asm                                  ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.rac01.LISTENER_ORRCDBTSL01.lsnr                 ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.rac01.gsd                                      OFFLINE    OFFLINE
ora.rac01.ons                                       ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.rac01.vip                                      ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.rac02.ASM2.asm                                 ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.rac02.LISTENER_ORRCDBTSL02.lsnr                ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.rac02.gsd                                       OFFLINE    OFFLINE
ora.rac02.ons                                       ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.rac02.vip                                       ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.registry.acfs                                  ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.scan1.vip                                      ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
ora.scan2.vip                                      ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02
ora.scan3.vip                                      ONLINE     ONLINE on rac02

ora.testdb.db                                      ONLINE     ONLINE on rac01
[grid@rac02 grid]$

Hope it helps
SRI

Posted in 11g New Features, 11gR2 RAC | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

11gR2 – RAC Shared Storage Preparation(NFS) – Part3

Posted by Srikrishna Murthy Annam on March 24, 2010

RAC Shared Storage Preparation(NFS):

The Network File System (NFS) was developed to allow machines to mount a disk partition on a remote machine as if it were on a local hard drive. This allows for fast, seamless sharing of files across a network. The advantage of NFS today is that it is mature, standard, well understood, and supported robustly across a variety of platforms.

Check if the system supports NFS File system:

$ cat /proc/filesystems

Verifying that NFS is running:
To do this, query the portmapper with the command rpcinfo -p to find out what services it is providing. You should get something like this:

program vers proto port
100000 2 tcp 111 portmapper
100000 2 udp 111 portmapper
100011 1 udp 749 rquotad
100011 2 udp 749 rquotad
100005 1 udp 759 mountd
100005 1 tcp 761 mountd
100005 2 udp 764 mountd
100005 2 tcp 766 mountd
100005 3 udp 769 mountd
100005 3 tcp 771 mountd
100003 2 udp 2049 nfs
100003 3 udp 2049 nfs
300019 1 tcp 830 amd
300019 1 udp 831 amd
100024 1 udp 944 status
100024 1 tcp 946 status
100021 1 udp 1042 nlockmgr
100021 3 udp 1042 nlockmgr
100021 4 udp 1042 nlockmgr
100021 1 tcp 1629 nlockmgr
100021 3 tcp 1629 nlockmgr
100021 4 tcp 1629 nlockmgr

This says that we have NFS versions 2 and 3, rpc.statd version 1, network lock manager (the service name for rpc.lockd) versions 1, 3, and 4. There are also different service listings depending on whether NFS is travelling over TCP or UDP. Linux systems use UDP by default unless TCP is explicitly requested; however other OSes such as Solaris default to TCP.

If you do not at least see a line that says “portmapper”, a line that says “nfs”, and a line that says “mountd” then you will need to backtrack and try again to start up the daemons

Setting up the Configuration files:
There are three main configuration files you will need to edit to set up an NFS server: /etc/exports, /etc/hosts.allow, and /etc/hosts.deny. Strictly speaking, you only need to edit /etc/exports to get NFS to work, but you would be left with an extremely insecure setup.

An entry in /etc/exports will typically look like this:

directory machine1(option11,option12) machine2(option21,option22)

First we need to set up some NFS shares. In this case we will do this on the RAC1 node, but you can do the on a NAS or a third server if you have one available. On the RAC1 node create the following directories.

mkdir /home/nfs/config
mkdir /home/nfs/grid
mkdir /home/nfs/oracle_home
mkdir /home/nfs/data

Add the following lines to the /etc/exports file

/home/nfs/config               *(rw,sync,no_wdelay,insecure_locks,no_root_squash)
/home/nfs/grid                 *(rw,sync,no_wdelay,insecure_locks,no_root_squash)
/home/nfs/oracle_home          *(rw,sync,no_wdelay,insecure_locks,no_root_squash)
/home/nfs/data                 *(rw,sync,no_wdelay,insecure_locks,no_root_squash)

Then restart the nfs services

# /etc/init.d/nfs restart

On both RAC1 and RAC2 create the local directories in which the Oracle software will be installed.

mkdir -p /u01/app/11.2.0/grid
mkdir -p /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1
mkdir -p /u01/oradata
mkdir -p /u01/config
chown -R oracle:oinstall /u01/app /u01/app/oracle /u01/oradata /u01/config
chmod -R 775 /u01/app /u01/app/oracle /u01/oradata /u01/config

Mount the nfs shares on to local directories :

# mount -t nfs <RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/config /u01/config
# mount -t nfs <RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/grid /u01/app/11.2.0/grid
# mount -t nfs <RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/oracle_home /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1
# mount -t nfs <RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/data /u01/oradata
# mount -t nfs <RAC2 IP>:/home/nfs/config /u01/config
# mount -t nfs <RAC2 IP>:/home/nfs/grid /u01/app/11.2.0/grid
# mount -t nfs <RAC2 IP>:/home/nfs/oracle_home /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1
# mount -t nfs <RAC2 IP>:/home/nfs/data /u01/oradata

Configure automount
To make this completely transparent to end users, you can automount the NFS file system every time a user boots a PC, or you can also use PAM modules to mount once a user logs in with a proper username and password. In this situation just edit /etc/fstab to mount system automatically during a system boot.

#echo “<RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/config /u01/config  nfs  defaults 0 0” >> /etc/fstab
#echo “<RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/grid   /u01/app/11.2.0/grid  nfs  defaults 0 0” >> /etc/fstab
#echo “<RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/oracle_home   /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1  nfs  defaults 0 0” >> /etc/fstab
#echo “<RAC1 IP>:/home/nfs/data   /u01/oradata  nfs  defaults 0 0” >> /etc/fstab

Posted in 11gR2 RAC | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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